Box Office: ‘Wolf Warrior 2’s $600M+ Success Should Terrify Hollywood

Box Office: ‘Wolf Warrior 2’s $600M+ Success Should Terrify Hollywood

‘Wolf Warrior 2’ With a 14-day total of $593.9 million in China alone, counting online ticketing fees, Wu Jing’s Wolf Warrior 2 will almost certainly end the weekend among the very biggest single-territory grossers of all time. It is crossing $600m today, on its 15 th day of release […]

With a 14-day total of $593.9 million in China alone, counting online ticketing fees, Wu Jing’s Wolf Warrior 2 will almost certainly end the weekend among the very biggest single-territory grossers of all time. It is crossing $600m today, on its 15th day of release (thanks to time zone magic, “today” is actually Friday in China), and is going to make a run at besting The Force Awakens’ record-setting $90m third Fri-Sun weekend. Even if it doesn’t go the distance, and if it drops by 51% from last weekend’s record-crushing $161m frame, we’re still looking at an over/under $80m third weekend and a 17-day total of around $673m. That would be the third-biggest single-territory grosser, not adjusted for inflation or exchange rates, behind only 20th Century Fox’s Avatar ($760m in North America) and Walt Disney’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens ($937m in North America).

Or maybe the demand will dry up, as it always seems to even when you think a film is unstoppable. Plenty of big films (Spider-Man, American Sniper, The Passion of the Christ, etc.) have followed up huge opening weekends with superb legs only to quickly wind down merely due to the sheer amount of demand being met in those first 10-17 days. Obviously, we’ll know more this weekend, and there is a difference between slowing down after a month and slowing down after two weeks when the numbers are this big. To be blunt, this isn’t the world’s best news for a Hollywood somewhat counting on China to deliver mega-bucks results for its blockbuster franchise offerings. Long story short, if Chinese movies can deliver approximate thrills and chills with local talent and Chinese movie stars, the English language/American action spectaculars are going to be slightly less essential.

Will ‘Hawaii Five-0’ Flap Lead to Changes for Actors of Color?

Will ‘Hawaii Five-0’ Flap Lead to Changes for Actors of Color?

Hollywood representation is one of the major issues within the Asian American community.  Why does it matter? Because it impacts every aspect of every Asian American’s lives.  Everything from self esteem, self confidence, dating, and career advancement are impacted consciously or subconsciously.  The bottom line is media representation matters.  T

CBS “Hawaii Five-0” series regulars Daniel Dae Kim and Grace Park are exiting the show after contract negotiations broke down, and the situation has added fuel to a bigger discussion as to whether Hollywood is making advancements toward inclusivity. CBS said in a statement on Wednesday that it offered […]

The Racial and Religious Paranoia of Trump’s Warsaw Speech

The Racial and Religious Paranoia of Trump’s Warsaw Speech

U.S. President Donald Trump gives a public speech at Krasinski Square in Warsaw. In his speech in Poland on Thursday, Donald Trump referred 10 times to “the West” and five times to “our civilization.” His white nationalist supporters will understand exactly what he means. It’s important that other Americans […]

 

Americans Are Shrinking, While Chinese And Koreans Sprout Up

Americans Are Shrinking, While Chinese And Koreans Sprout Up

The countries with the tallest and shortest 18-year-old men and women in the world, according to a new study Whatever South Korean women are eating, pass it around! The country is having a massive growth spurt. And it doesn’t look like it’s slowing down anytime soon. Women in South […]

Whatever South Korean women are eating, pass it around!

The country is having a massive growth spurt. And it doesn’t look like it’s slowing down anytime soon.

Women in South Korea have gained 8 inches in height, on average, in the past century — a jump bigger than any other population in the world, researchers reported Tuesday.

For men, Iranians are the big winners, gaining 6.5 inches in the past hundred years.

In contrast, Americans are falling behind. Back in 1914, the U.S. had the third tallest men and fourth tallest women in the world. Now it’s in the middle of the pack, ranking around 40th for both men and women.

People around the world grew by leaps and bounds in the first half of the 20th century. But in the past 30 to 40 years, average adult height has plateaued or slightly declined in many countries, including the U.S. In parts of Africa and the Middle East, height is on the decline, while in much of East Asia, it continues to climb. In South Asia, height has plateaued at a much lower level than seen in Western countries.

Whatever South Korean women are eating, pass it around!

The country is having a massive growth spurt. And it doesn’t look like it’s slowing down anytime soon.

Women in South Korea have gained 8 inches in height, on average, in the past century — a jump bigger than any other population in the world, researchers reported Tuesday.

For men, Iranians are the big winners, gaining 6.5 inches in the past hundred years.

People around the world grew by leaps and bounds in the first half of the 20th century. But in the past 30 to 40 years, average adult height has plateaued or slightly declined in many countries, including the U.S. In parts of Africa and the Middle East, height is on the decline, while in much of East Asia, it continues to climb. In South Asia, height has plateaued at a much lower level than seen in Western countries.

Height of 18-year-old men, 1914-2014

The stats on average national heights come from a giant study published in the journal eLife, which looks at how heights around the world have changed over the past century.

  • American stagnation: In the past century, Americans haven’t actually grown very much — only about 2 inches.
  • Land of giants: Sweden was home to both the tallest men and women in 1914. But today, the Baltic countries reign supreme. Both Latvia and Estonia rank in the top five for tallest men and women.
  • Petite ladies: Guatemalan women were the shortest in the world in 1914, measuring just about 4 1/2 feet. They retain that title today, but have grown about 5 inches.
  • The gender gap: Men are taller than women in every country by about 5 inches, on average. A century ago, that difference was slightly lower, at 4 inches.Here in the U.S., heights have plateaued — or even started to decline slightly. They peaked in 1988 for women and 1996 for men.

    “There was a time when the U.S. was the land of plenty,” says Majid Ezzati, of Imperial College London, who helped to lead the study. “But increasingly over time, the quality of nutrition has worsened.”

    Income inequality has increased in the U.S. since the 1970s, the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities reported. “In some sense, you have a large part of the population who are not getting quality food,” Ezzati says. “That drags down the whole place.”

    The decline here may also be due, in part, to immigration from Central America and South Asia, where people tend to be shorter, Ezzati says.

    For the study, Ezzati and nearly 800 scientists combed through about 1,500 surveys to come up with the measured heights for about 18.6 million people in 200 countries.

    East Asians stood out for their exceptional growth. Eighteen-year-olds in Japan, China and South Korea are much taller today than a century ago. While growth in Japan has started to decline a bit, like the countries in the West, China and South Korea continue to climb the height ladder.

    Africa may be rising economically, but its people are shrinking. In many countries, 18-year-old men have gotten shorter since the 1970s and 1960s, after the end of the colonial era.

    “You have countries that suddenly cut their entire health care budgets and agricultural [budgets] by large amounts,” Ezzati says. “Those who were affected the most were the poorest.”

    Although genes play a big role in determining how many inches we sprout up during childhood, average height is a great litmus test for the overall health of a population.

    Nutrition and the number of childhood infections help determine how tall you grow. “And there’s increasingly good evidence that people who are taller on average tend to live longer,” Ezzati says.

    “A big part of that is due to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease [for taller men and women],” he says. Taller women also have a lower risk of complications during childbirth, and their newborn babies are less likely to die than those born to shorter women.

    In contrast, shorter people have a lower risk for some cancers, such as colon cancer, Ezzati says. “But on the balance, it’s better to be taller, healthwise.”

    And having extra inches as a kid is also connected to success later in life. “Being taller is actually a good marker of better educational attainment and higher income,” he adds. “Those are big changes with big benefits [to society].”

Singaporean man celebrates after his penis is officially confirmed as world’s longest

Singaporean man celebrates after his penis is officially confirmed as world’s longest

So much for Western stereotypes.  

File photo of guests at Japan’s annual penis festival. Source: AR Archive A 26-year old man from Singapore now officially has the world’s longest penis after he was measured by the world record authority at his home in Bukit Panjang earlier this week. The new world record holder, who […]

Click here to view original web page at www.pressunion.org

The new world record holder, who requested to be identified only as Daniel to protect his identity, spoke to journalists at a press conference held after the measurement ceremony. “I am just thrilled at this, as you can imagine,’ he told reporters.

Why I Left Behind America To Live In Vietnam

Why I Left Behind America To Live In Vietnam

I am John, and I am Hung. I am American, and I am Vietnamese. Born and raised in America, I spent 80 days traveling through Vietnam with no money living along side Vietnamese farmers, fishermen, and people from all walks of life because I wanted so desperately to be […]

I am John, and I am Hung. I am American, and I am Vietnamese. Born and raised in America, I spent 80 days traveling through Vietnam with no money living along side Vietnamese farmers, fishermen, and people from all walks of life because I wanted so desperately to be Vietnamese. The incredible experience culminated in my book “John đi tìm Hùng” (John finding Hùng), which was a writing prompt in the 2013 National University entrance exam and has been enshrined into the Vietnam National Library.

I first came to Vietnam in 2010 on a UC Berkeley exchange program without being able to speak the language and knowing very little about the country. However, as I began to immerse myself and explore the culture, I fell in love. This was not only my motherland, but this was to be home.

Vietnam has allotted me the opportunity to do many of the things I’ve always wanted to do, such as, being a TV host, a college professor, an author and an entrepreneur. More importantly, it gave me a sense of purpose in life. I want to be an integral part of Vietnam’s development and guide the youth towards building a better Vietnam.